Solar Powered Generator for an Emergency Situation

We all remember what it was like to go without power during Hurricane Ike. Now a local man believes he has found a way to generate electricity using something you may have at home.
Coming up we’ll take a closer look at his DIY solar powered generator which he says would also help the environment.
During Hurricane Ike, most of us spend time without power and for many it was weeks before electricity was finally restored. Now a Devry’s student, who remembers first hand the frustration he felt following the storm, has created a unique way of generating power using something you probably have at home. Going Green tonight, KPRC Local 2 reporter Courtney Gilmore, takes a closer look:

Ben Klaver turned a cooler into his own Solar (Panel) Generator. He claims it was easy.

How Long Does It Takes To Build DIY Solar Panel

The time to build it, it only took about 30 minutes to an hour but to actually think about it and plan it all out, about 2 to 3 days.
Outside, the solar panel collects energy from the sun but it’s inside the cooler where the battery and the inverter are, that the magic happens.
It goes straight out of the outlet that’s wired into the outlet.
After Hurricane Ike, Ben wanted to design something that is eco-friendly and practical. And as a cooler, if you lose power, you got a place to keep your emergency rations.

What Is The Usage Of this DIY Solar Panel

You can just put your drinks and throw ice in there so when you have an actual cooler, cause it is still water proof.
It travels on wheels so we take it down to Galveston and tried it out on the beach. And now, it’s my turn, so it’s a good thing it has wheels to get more power. All we do is to take it outside and once we’re outside, the light will change from red to green saying we got lots of power.
And sure gives off enough power to keep my temperature low.
Ben says it can also power a radio, a computer, and a car.
I went outside and a friend of mine, his car died and I was like well I don’t want to take my battery out of the thing so we just put jumper cables to it.
Giving a friend a jump, keeping your drinks cool and staying green – now that’s functionality!
And not surprisingly Ben says he‘s been getting calls to build more of these solar powered generators. It cost him a little under $1000 to make but he’s assured that the price will go down for the next one he builds.

Here is a very close product which you can buy on Amazon:

One thought on “Solar Powered Generator for an Emergency Situation”

  1. Dear Mr.Off Grid Ebert,I aaplpud you for sharing your off the grid experience. In todays economy many people are searching for alternative way to survive, many trying to be enviromentally consious or just doing what it takes to survive. Living off the grid does not have to be a difficult process or require huge sacrifices. With a little knowledge anyone can set up the average household to run on a budget and convert the house in phases. If I may share my experience. I live in the northeastern U.S. My young sons and I have been off the grid for over a year. Using a small Briggs and Straton generator 7500 watt and 8 120 watt and 8 55 watt solar Panels purchased second hand one at a time. We have been builing a battery bank as our budget allows buying (12 volt deep cycle batteries) . we use an inexpensive sine inverter to run the lights in the house. a $50 basic charge controller and a Iota interface to help keep the battery bank charged when the generator is in use, and a 6 circut power converter (all found on the internet..how to sites). We live a very normal life enjoying hot showers. TV. movies high speed internet and even our hot tub and electric blanket on cold nights .The way we accomplish this is to connect the fuse panel curcuits so everything in our house runs into (3) a home made fuse switch panel everthing 220 (well pump, hot water heater, hot tub, oven) run off the generator when they are needed only 2 things on at any given time. Everything else runs off solar or the generator depending on the weather and battery power availability. We do cook on a small propane burner stove and use a turkey cooker to bake with. Heat is wood and propane as needed. it does come with chalanges at times. If we want hot water, we must not forget to turn on the switch when the generator is on or devert the power as needed to a section of our home. On cold morning someone must go out to turn on the generator and maintain the fuel. My children are now very consious of turning off lights, and if they want to play video games or watch TV; something (zone) must be turned off. With rising fuel cost we are very conscious of how long we run things. All power is turned off when we leave home except for the refridgerator, and alarm system. It has been worth the headaches and we are saving for a propane generator and more batteries. It has been a rewarding and learning experience. And if nothing else has strengthened my bond with my boys as we work together on this project and is rewarding to watch them learn to appriciate many things in life.

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